life as "walking to meet ourselves"

I'm on vacation—travelled through the Baltic capitals of Vilnius, Riga andTalinn, now in Helsinki, and on to St. Petersburg—and came across a flyer for a performance piece called Memories for Life about "the past and the present, the old and the young." It quotes Imants Ziedonis (1933-2013) , a Latvian poet who rose to fame during the Soviet occupation of Latvia, who wrote, "We do not walk towards death. We do not walk towards getting old. We walk to meet ourselves. We walk to meet our Other Me.

nice blurb from Lifetime Arts

Lifetime Arts is a nonprofit that "promotes creative aging through professionally conducted arts education for older adults." The organization understands that raising awareness of ageism is central to their mission, and I've given my talk at several of their training institutes. Last week I took the train up to Chappaqua to speak to librarians from seven states, who are participating in a national Creative Aging in America's Libraries project, and co-founders Maura O’Malley and Ed Friedman had nice things to say.

If you’re not too old to love heavy metal, you’re not too old to go hear it.

Writer and movie reviewer D.M Anderson is also a middle-aged heavy-metal fan – the latter uneasily, as he describes in An Essay on Ageism (nominally a review of Tom Cruise’s latest sci-fi vehicle, Edge of Tomorrow).“As much as I’d still love seeing my favorite bands live, more often than not, I choose not to attend,” Anderson writes.

first topic for a social science blog: the latest Census Report on older Americans

 

I’ve been part of the Council on Contemporary Families since it was founded 20 years ago to provide solid social science about American families to the press and the public. My post about the latest Census Report on older Americans is up now on their Families As They Really Are blog on the Society Pages site:

 

Guest Post: Aging-in-Place: It Can Be Detrimental to Your Health

Anti-ageism activist, social worker, and guest blogger Alice Fisher is back with a moving and deeply informed piece about why aging-in-place isn’t the panacea being so widely promoted. I wish my mother-in-law, who turns 92 next week, would read and believe it. She and Bill, her husband of 69 years, have been paying for long-term-care insurance for decades in order to be able to remain in their apartment. When I said to Bob, “Your mom would be so much happier in a home after your dad dies,” his response was instant. “She’d be happier in a home now."

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